November 2023

Anya Taylor Joy's Favourite Books

— Anya Taylor-Joy's love for books is as evident as her on-screen talent. She has shared some of her favorite book recommendations in interviews, ranging from classics to modern-day masterpieces. Her book choices provide insight into her creative mind and give fans a glimpse into her interests. It's clear that reading is a way for Anya Taylor-Joy to escape and relax, and her passion for literature is as contagious as it is inspiring.
Anya Taylor Joy's Favourite Books
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Anya Taylor-Joy is a British-Argentine actress who has gained a lot of popularity in recent years. She has starred in a variety of films and TV shows, including "The Queen's Gambit," "Emma," and "Split." However, in addition to her acting skills, Anya Taylor-Joy is also an avid reader and has a love for books. She has shared some of her favorite book recommendations in interviews, and in this blog post, we will take a closer look at some of these books and learn a little bit more about Anya Taylor-Joy's background.


Anya Taylor-Joy was born in Miami, Florida, in 1996. Her mother is English and her father is Argentine. She spent most of her childhood in Buenos Aires, Argentina, before moving to London with her family when she was six years old. Taylor-Joy was homeschooled and grew up bilingual, speaking both English and Spanish fluently.


Taylor-Joy started her career as a model when she was just 16 years old. She eventually transitioned into acting and landed her first major role in the horror film "The Witch" in 2015. She has since become a rising star in Hollywood, earning critical acclaim for her performances in a variety of films and TV shows.


Aside from acting, Anya Taylor-Joy is also known for her love of books. She has mentioned in interviews that she has been an avid reader since she was a child and that reading is a way for her to escape and relax. Some of her favorite books include:


  1. "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde - This classic novel tells the story of a young man who sells his soul in exchange for eternal youth and beauty.
  2. "The Bell Jar" by Sylvia Plath - This semi-autobiographical novel tells the story of a young woman's descent into mental illness.
  3. "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger - This coming-of-age novel follows a teenage boy named Holden Caulfield as he navigates his way through life and deals with the challenges of growing up.
  4. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee - This Pulitzer Prize-winning novel tells the story of a young girl growing up in the South during the 1930s and her father's quest for justice.
  5. "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald - This classic novel is set in the 1920s and tells the story of a wealthy man's quest to win back the love of his life.


It's clear that Anya Taylor-Joy has a love for classic literature, and her book recommendations reflect this. Her taste in books is diverse, ranging from horror to coming-of-age stories to classics that have stood the test of time.

Today's world is rife with brutality and suffering. We are socialized from birth to accept society's rules as "the way it is," but doing so prevents us from realizing our potential. However, there is another way to live. We can break away from the old norms and discover peace and pleasure if we replace the outdated agreements with four straightforward new ones. The Four Agreements are: Be Impeccable With Your Word, Don't Take Anything Personally, Don't Make Assumptions, Always Do Your Best.

Our favourite quote from The Four Agreements

Whatever happens around you, don't take it personally... Nothing other people do is because of you. It is because of themselves.

In The Four Agreements, bestselling author don Miguel Ruiz reveals the source of self-limiting beliefs that rob us of joy and create needless suffering. Based on ancient Toltec wisdom, The Four Agreements offer a powerful code of conduct that can rapidly transform our lives to a new experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.

A New York Times bestseller for over a decade with over 8.5 million copies sold in the U.S.

The same recipe for success has been taught to us for years: Begin practicing as soon as you can, and keep going until you're the best in the world. There is no use in beginning your training now if you haven't already because you are already behind. Fortunately for us, this success formula is a hoax. The real road to excellence is far more adaptable.

Former Sports Illustrated writer David Epstein has made a living by writing about the science of athletics. In Range, Epstein argues in favor of generalism, or having a broad range of skills rather than a deep specialization. Developing range not only allows you to focus more on your passions but also has unexpected benefits in the workplace.

Our favourite quote from Range

Modern work demands knowledge transfer: the ability to apply knowledge to new situations and different domains. Our most fundamental thought processes have changed to accommodate increasing complexity and the need to derive new patterns rather than rely only on familiar ones. Our conceptual classification schemes provide a scaffolding for connecting knowledge, making it accessible and flexible.

The #1 New York Times bestseller that has all America talking: as seen/heard on Morning Joe, CBS This Morning, The Bill Simmons Podcast, Rich Roll, and more.

Shortlisted for the Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award

“The most important business—and parenting—book of the year.” —Forbes

“Urgent and important. . . an essential read for bosses, parents, coaches, and anyone who cares about improving performance.” —Daniel H. Pink  

“So much crucial and revelatory information about performance, success, and education.” —Susan Cain, bestselling author of Quiet  

“As David Epstein shows us, cultivating range prepares us for the wickedly unanticipated… a well-supported and smoothly written case on behalf of breadth and late starts.” —Wall Street Journal

Plenty of experts argue that anyone who wants to develop a skill, play an instrument, or lead their field should start early, focus intensely, and rack up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. If you dabble or delay, you’ll never catch up to the people who got a head start. But a closer look at research on the world’s top performers, from professional athletes to Nobel laureates, shows that early specialization is the exception, not the rule.    

David Epstein examined the world’s most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, forecasters and scientists. He discovered that in most fields—especially those that are complex and unpredictable—generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. Generalists often find their path late, and they juggle many interests rather than focusing on one. They’re also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can’t see.

Provocative, rigorous, and engrossing, Range makes a compelling case for actively cultivating inefficiency. Failing a test is the best way to learn. Frequent quitters end up with the most fulfilling careers. The most impactful inventors cross domains rather than deepening their knowledge in a single area. As experts silo themselves further while computers master more of the skills once reserved for highly focused humans, people who think broadly and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives will increasingly thrive.

Our favourite quote from I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.

Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide. Her life story is told in the documentary film And Still I Rise, as seen on PBS’s American Masters.

Here is a book as joyous and painful, as mysterious and memorable, as childhood itself. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right. Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide.

Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local “powhitetrash.” At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age—and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns that love for herself, the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (“I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare”) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned.

Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read.

“I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings liberates the reader into life simply because Maya Angelou confronts her own life with such a moving wonder, such a luminous dignity.”—James Baldwin

Our favourite quote from Conversations with Friends

Gradually the waiting began to feel less like waiting and more like this was simply what life was: the distracting tasks undertaken while the thing you are waiting for continues not to happen.

Frances is a coolheaded and darkly observant young woman, vaguely pursuing a career in writing while studying in Dublin. Her best friend is the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi. At a local poetry performance one night, they meet a well-known photographer, and as the girls are then gradually drawn into her world, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman’s sophisticated home and handsome husband, Nick. But however amusing Frances and Nick’s flirtation seems at first, it begins to give way to a strange—and then painful—intimacy.

Written with gemlike precision and marked by a sly sense of humor, Conversations with Friends is wonderfully alive to the pleasures and dangers of youth, and the messy edges of female friendship.

Our favourite quote from The Year of Magical Thinking

A single person is missing for you, and the whole world is empty.

'An act of consummate literary bravery, a writer known for her clarity allowing us to watch her mind as it becomes clouded with grief.'

From one of America's iconic writers, a stunning book of electric honesty and passion. Joan Didion explores an intensely personal yet universal experience: a portrait of a marriage–and a life, in good times and bad–that will speak to anyone who has ever loved a husband or wife or child.

Several days before Christmas 2003, John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion saw their only daughter, Quintana, fall ill with what seemed at first flu, then pneumonia, then complete septic shock. She was put into an induced coma and placed on life support. Days later–the night before New Year's Eve–the Dunnes were just sitting down to dinner after visiting the hospital when John Gregory Dunne suffered a massive and fatal coronary. In a second, this close, symbiotic partnership of forty years was over. Four weeks later, their daughter pulled through. Two months after that, arriving at LAX, she collapsed and underwent six hours of brain surgery at UCLA Medical Center to relieve a massive hematoma.

This powerful book is Didion's attempt to make sense of the "weeks and then months that cut loose any fixed idea I ever had about death, about illness . . . about marriage and children and memory . . . about the shallowness of sanity, about life itself."

Our favourite quote from Giovanni's Room

Perhaps home is not a place but simply an irrevocable condition.

Baldwin's haunting and controversial second novel is his most sustained treatment of sexuality, and a classic of gay literature. In a 1950s Paris swarming with expatriates and characterized by dangerous liaisons and hidden violence, an American finds himself unable to repress his impulses, despite his determination to live the conventional life he envisions for himself. After meeting and proposing to a young woman, he falls into a lengthy affair with an Italian bartender and is confounded and tortured by his sexual identity as he oscillates between the two.

Examining the mystery of love and passion in an intensely imagined narrative, Baldwin creates a moving and complex story of death and desire that is revelatory in its insight.

Our favourite quote from What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

There was a time when I thought I loved my first wife more than life itself. But now I hate her guts. I do. How do you explain that? What happened to that love? What happened to it, is what I'd like to know. I wish someone could tell me.

In his second collection, Carver establishes his reputation as one of the most celebrated and beloved short-story writers in American literature—a haunting meditation on love, loss, and companionship, and finding one’s way through the dark.

Our favourite quote from The White Album

We tell ourselves stories in order to live...We look for the sermon in the suicide, for the social or moral lesson in the murder of five. We interpret what we see, select the most workable of the multiple choices. We live entirely, especially if we are writers, by the imposition of a narrative line upon disparate images, by the "ideas" with which we have learned to freeze the shifting phantasmagoria which is our actual experience.

First published in 1979, The White Album records indelibly the upheavals and aftermaths of the 1960s. Examining key events, figures, and trends of the era―including Charles Manson, the Black Panthers, and the shopping mall―through the lens of her own spiritual confusion, Joan Didion helped to define mass culture as we now understand it. Written with a commanding sureness of tone and linguistic precision, The White Album is a central text of American reportage and a classic of American autobiography.

Our favourite quote from The Argonauts

Empirically speaking, we are made of star stuff. Why aren’t we talking more about that?

An intrepid voyage out to the frontiers of the latest thinking about love, language, and family.

Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of "autotheory" offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. It binds an account of Nelson's relationship with her partner and a journey to and through a pregnancy to a rigorous exploration of sexuality, gender, and "family." An insistence on radical individual freedom and the value of caretaking becomes the rallying cry for this thoughtful, unabashed, uncompromising book.

Our favourite quote from Bad Feminist

I embrace the label of bad feminist because I am human. I am messy. I’m not trying to be an example. I am not trying to be perfect. I am not trying to say I have all the answers. I am not trying to say I’m right. I am just trying—trying to support what I believe in, trying to do some good in this world, trying to make some noise with my writing while also being myself.

Pink is my favorite color. I used to say my favorite color was black to be cool, but it is pink—all shades of pink. If I have an accessory, it is probably pink. I read Vogue, and I’m not doing it ironically, though it might seem that way. I once live-tweeted the September issue.

In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman of color while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years and commenting on the state of feminism today. The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.

Bad Feminist is a sharp, funny, and spot-on look at the ways in which the culture we consume becomes who we are, and an inspiring call-to-arms of all the ways we still need to do better.

Our favourite quote from The Bloody Chamber

She herself is a haunted house. She does not possess herself; her ancestors sometimes come and peer out of the windows of her eyes and that is very frightening.

For the 75th anniversary of her birth, a Deluxe Edition of the master of the literary supernatural’s most celebrated book—featuring a new introduction by Kelly Link

Angela Carter was a storytelling sorceress, the literary godmother of Neil Gaiman, David Mitchell, Audrey Niffenegger, J. K. Rowling, Kelly Link, and other contemporary masters of supernatural fiction. In her masterpiece, The Bloody Chamber—which includes the story that is the basis of Neil Jordan’s 1984 movie The Company of Wolves—she spins subversively dark and sensual versions of familiar fairy tales and legends like “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Bluebeard,” “Puss in Boots,” and “Beauty and the Beast,” giving them exhilarating new life in a style steeped in the romantic trappings of the gothic tradition.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Our favourite quote from Bright Lights, Big City

Everything becomes symbol and irony when you've been betrayed.

With the publication of Bright Lights, Big City in 1984, Jay McInerney became a literary sensation, heralded as the voice of a generation. The novel follows a young man, living in Manhattan as if he owned it, through nightclubs, fashion shows, editorial offices, and loft parties as he attempts to outstrip mortality and the recurring approach of dawn. With nothing but goodwill, controlled substances, and wit to sustain him in this anti-quest, he runs until he reaches his reckoning point, where he is forced to acknowledge loss and, possibly, to rediscover his better instincts. This remarkable novel of youth and New York remains one of the most beloved, imitated, and iconic novels in America.

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Anya Taylor-Joy is a talented actress and an avid reader. Her book recommendations give insight into her interests and provide a glimpse into her creative mind. It's clear that her love for literature has played a significant role in her life, and her passion for reading is something that many of her fans can relate to.

Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.